Balance or Separation: Managing Professional & Personal Social Media Pages | Part 2

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In a bid to be conscious of our thoughts, actions and followers – persons make the decision to create a “balance” in their lives by separating their personalities, ideas and interests. But is separation balance or dishonesty? As we strive to ensure that the right followers get the “right” information (through the separation of our accounts) are we also in the same breath hiding information?

When you decided to enter the professional world, the world that decided that “toosexy4u@hotmail.com”, wild drunk poses as profile pictures and curse words won’t be acceptable – did you delete these things, start new accounts or increase your privacy settings to keep inquisitive eyes at bay?

No matter your response, or your current role in life (personal or professional) you are the representative of your own brand firstly. All other roles are secondary. So is the separation of your personal and professional social media pages really necessary? Some will still say yes, and we will discuss why.

As promised from our previous post, where we discussed balancing of social media accounts – this time around we have to discuss the pros and cons of separating. The concept of setting targets, guidelines and structure to how our online presence is assessed.

Pros of Separating Accounts

  • Focused. Content posted will be inextricably linked to the business – services, deals, tips, news, staff, etc.
  • Once your posts have personality, followers are sure of the type of content to expect, and you are certain that the followers have some interest in the business.
  • You now have a targeted group of persons to which you can share or pitch the services of your business.
  • Targets for growth can be set for the professional accounts.
  • You now have control of the persons who are allowed in your personal space (through privacy settings), while being able to leave the professional account open.
  • Clear work-life boundaries.

Cons of Separating Accounts

  • Hard to manage. Will you always remember to devote equal time to each brand.
  • As a small business, you might need to hire someone to manage the professional account on your behalf. This may not necessarily be very cost effective for a new business.
  • Are you being viewed as being dishonest by separating (hiding) an account from followers.

Social media accounts require a professional human, lol. Weird term, I know. But it’s true. We want to live our lives on social media, socializing and being entertained, but at the same time with enough decorum that when our employers view our pages we can still look them straight in the eyes the next day and not have the slightest embarrassing moment.

So how do we do this?

By separating our accounts or balancing all personalities in the social online sphere? In making this choice, be sure to remember, that whatever you post online is no longer yours. It can almost be likened to sending a text message which you can’t erase from the receiver. And no matter your life long aim to separate your accounts, the right investigator can uncover what you have been trying so ‘hard’ to hide.

It’s Pixel Perfect’s Managing Director, Conrad Mathison, was recently put on the spot by Wealth Magazine, and asked his views on this very topic. He will share pertinent points from his “panel discussion to guest speaker” at Corporate Mingle presentation. His thoughts, as a young entrepreneur, socialite, friend, brother, son should be even more enlightening. Is he balancing or separating? Will he even choose a side? All will be revealed in his blog post.

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